Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A collection of quotes and sayings by Fanny Fern on love, romance, humor, marriage, matrimony, shame, devil, feminism, heart, lies, compel, doubt, breath and response.

31 Famous Quotes By Fanny Fern That Have A Mischievous Glint

Quick Facts

Famous As: Journalist, Writer, Novelist, Children's writer, Essayist

Born On: July 9, 1811

Died On: October 10, 1872

Born In: Portland

Died At Age: 61

Sara Willis, popularly known as Fanny Fern, was an American humorist, newspaper columnist, children book author and novelist. She went on to become one of the most renowned female authors during that period. She wrote for the publication ‘New York Ledger’ and due to her immense popularity, she also became the highest paid columnist in America. In 1855, Fern was paid a then mind boggling salary of $100 per week and her style particularly appealed the thriving ladies in America at that time. Other than being a noted columnist, Fern was also a highly successful author and one of her most important books is ‘Ruth Hall’, published in 1854, that is regarded as a cornerstone of feminist literature. Fern also became quite famous as a writer of children’s books and some of the noted ones include ‘The New Story Book for Children’, ‘Little Ferns for Fanny’s Little Friends’ and ‘The Play-Day Book’. Fern wrote about a wide range of subjects throughout her career. Feminist themes were particularly close to her heart and her writings expressed her views and thoughts on the same. Read through the quotes and thoughts by Fanny Fern which have been excerpted from her columns, books, essays and public utterances.

She said it was beautiful to be loved, and that it made everything on earth look brighter.

Fanny Fern

I am convinced that there are times in everybody's experience when there is so much to be done, that the only way to do it is to sit down and do nothing.

Fanny Fern

What a pity when editors review a woman's book, that they so often fall into the error of reviewing the woman instead.

Fanny Fern

Can anybody tell me why reporters, in making mention of lady speakers, always consider it to be necessary to report, fully and firstly, the dresses worn by them? When John Jones or Senator Rouser frees his mind in public, we are left in painful ignorance of the color and fit of his pants, coat, necktie and vest - and worse still, the shape of his boots. This seems to me a great omission.

Fanny Fern

Our domestic Napoleons, too many of them, give flattery, bonnets and bracelets to women, and everything else but - justice ...

Fanny Fern

The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach.

Fanny Fern

I am getting sick of people. I am falling in love with things. They hold their tongues ...

Fanny Fern

Uncles and aunts, and cousins, are all very well, and fathers and mothers are not to be despised; but a grandmother, at holiday time, is worth them all.

Fanny Fern

I want a human sermon. I don't care what Melchisedek, or Zerubbabel, or Kerenhappuk did, ages ago; I want to know what I am to do, and I want somebody besides a theological bookworm to tell me; somebody who is sometimes tempted and tried, and is not too dignified to own it; somebody like me, who is always sinning and repenting; somebody who is glad and sorry, and cries and laughs, and eats and drinks, and wants to fight when they are trodden on, and don't!

Fanny Fern

The term 'lady' has been so misused, that I like better the old-fashioned term, woman.

Fanny Fern

Hoary-headed old Winter, I have had enough of you!

Fanny Fern

To the Pilgrim Mothers, who not only had their full share of the hardships and privations of pioneer life but also had the Pilgrim Fathers to endure.

Fanny Fern

Too much indulgence has ruined thousands of children; too much love not one.

Fanny Fern

Few husbands (and the longer I observe, the more I am convinced of the truth of what I am about to say, and I make no exception in favor of education or station) have the magnanimity to use justly, generously, the power which the law puts in their hands.

Fanny Fern

To her, the name of father was another name for love.

Fanny Fern

Show me an 'easy person,' and I will show you a selfish one. Good-natured he may be; why not? since the disastrous consequences of his 'easiness' are generally shouldered by other people.

Fanny Fern

Everything in the country, animate and inanimate, seems to whisper, be serene, be kind, be happy. We grow tolerant there unconsciously.

Fanny Fern

Never ask a favor until you are drawing your last breath; and never forget one.

Fanny Fern

Dear reader, true religion is not gloomy.

Fanny Fern

There are no little things. Little things are the hinges of the universe.

Fanny Fern

How strong sometimes is weakness!

Fanny Fern

Love is a farce; matrimony is a humbug; husbands are domestic Napoleons, Neroes, Alexanders,--sighing for other hearts to conquer, after they are sure of yours.

Fanny Fern

I hate the word proper. If you tell me a thing is not proper, I immediately feel the most rabid desire to go 'neck and heels' into it.

Fanny Fern

I wish one half the world were not fools, and the other half idiots.

Fanny Fern

Well, it is a humiliating reflection, that the straightest road to a man's heart is through his palate.

Fanny Fern

I've as good a right to preserve the healthy body God gave me, as if I were not a woman.

Fanny Fern

O, girls! set your affections on cats, poodles, parrots or lap-dogs; but let matrimony alone. It's the hardest way on earth to getting a living.

Fanny Fern

When a literary person's exhaustive work is over, the last thing he wishes to do is to talk books.

Fanny Fern

Nowhere more than in New York does the contest between squalor and splendor so sharply present itself.

Fanny Fern

Never compel yourself to say words to which the heart yields no response.

Fanny Fern

Marriage is the hardest way to get a living.

Fanny Fern