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Uplifting quotes by William Wordsworth on nature, love, life, education and other things.

97 Uplifting Quotes By William Wordsworth, The Author Of Lyrical Ballads

Quick Facts

Famous As: Poet

Born On: April 7, 1770

Died On: April 23, 1850

Born In: Kingdom of Great Britain

Died At Age: 80

While counting the greatest of English poets ever to have lived on Earth, it is only certain that William Wordsworth would be amongst the first ones to be listed. For had it not been for this great man, the era of Romanticism in English poetry wouldn’t have existed! He is the man behind ‘Lyrical Ballads’ the man who penned ‘The Prelude’, the man who eventually became one of the most influential English Romantic poets of the century. Together with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Wordsworth launched the Romantic era of English literature, in which writers sought to unite the tranquillity of nature and the inner emotional world of men. He wanted to create poetry that allowed readers to reunite with their true emotions and feelings. In 1843, he was named Poet Laureate of Britain, a post which he retained until his death in 1850. Wordsworth’s most famous work, ‘The Prelude’, an autobiographical, is considered by many to be the crowning achievement of English romanticism. The poem, revised numerous times, chronicles the spiritual life of the poet and marks the birth of a new genre of poetry. Although Wordsworth worked on ‘The Prelude’ throughout his life, the poem was published posthumously. Much like his poetry, Wordsworth’s quotes give a new perspective to life. They cover varied topics like meaning of life, happiness, love and family. We bring to you some of the interesting quotes by William Wordsworth that will surely provide you with food for thought.
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Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart.

William Wordsworth

The best portion of a good man's life: his little, nameless unremembered acts of kindness and love.

William Wordsworth

Wisdom is oft-times nearer when we stoop Than when we soar.

William Wordsworth

Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.

William Wordsworth

Nature never did betray The heart that loved her.

William Wordsworth

Rest and be thankful.

William Wordsworth

Come grow old with me. The best is yet to be.

William Wordsworth

The music in my heart I bore Long after it was heard no more.

William Wordsworth

Come forth into the light of things, Let Nature be your teacher.

William Wordsworth

My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began; So is it now I am a man;

William Wordsworth

Dreams, books, are each a world; and books, we know, Are a substantial world, both pure and good: Round these, with tendrils strong as flesh and blood, Our pastime and our happiness will grow.

William Wordsworth

With an eye made quiet by the power of harmony, and the deep power of joy, we see into the life of things.

William Wordsworth

There is a comfort in the strength of love; 'Twill make a thing endurable, which else would overset the brain, or break the heart.

William Wordsworth

When from our better selves we have too long Been parted by the hurrying world, and droop, Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired, How gracious, how benign, is Solitude

William Wordsworth

The eye--it cannot choose but see; We cannot bid the ear be still; Our bodies feel, where'er they be, Against or with our will.

William Wordsworth

Bliss it was in that dawn to be alive But to be young was very heaven.

William Wordsworth

Love betters what is best

William Wordsworth

Habit rules the unreflecting herd.

William Wordsworth

Then my heart with pleasure fills And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth

For I have learned to look on nature, not as in the hour of thoughtless youth; but hearing oftentimes the still, sad music of humanity.

William Wordsworth

A mind forever Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.

William Wordsworth

Be mild, and cleave to gentle things, thy glory and thy happiness be there.

William Wordsworth

Delight and liberty, the simple creed of childhood.

William Wordsworth

Great God! I'd rather be a Pagan....

William Wordsworth

The mind of man is a thousand times more beautiful than the earth on which he dwells.

William Wordsworth

Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge - it is as immortal as the heart of man.

William Wordsworth

One impulse from a vernal wood May teach you more of man, Of moral evil and of good, Than all the sages can.

William Wordsworth

What we have loved Others will love And we will teach them how.

William Wordsworth

The good die first, and they whose hearts are dry as summer dust, burn to the socket.

William Wordsworth

The earth was all before me. With a heart Joyous, nor scared at its own liberty, I look about; and should the chosen guide Be nothing better than a wandering cloud, I cannot miss my way.

William Wordsworth

And yet the wiser mind Mourns less for what age takes away Than what it leaves behind.

William Wordsworth

Not in entire forgetfulness, And not in utter nakedness, But trailing clouds of glory do we come From God, who is our home.

William Wordsworth

Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of knowledge

William Wordsworth

The child is father of the man: And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.

William Wordsworth

A simple child. That lightly draws its breath. And feels its life in every limb. What should it know of death?

William Wordsworth

Faith is a passionate intuition.

William Wordsworth

... and we shall find A pleasure in the dimness of the stars.

William Wordsworth

Pictures deface walls more often than they decorate them.

William Wordsworth

For oft, when on my couch I lie in vacant or in pensive mood they flash upon that inward eye which is the bliss of solitude

William Wordsworth

Thanks to the human heart by which we live, Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and its fears, To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.

William Wordsworth

Sweet is the lore which nature brings; Our meddling intellect Misshapes the beauteous forms of things; —We murder to dissect.

William Wordsworth

Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting...

William Wordsworth

A lake carries you into recesses of feeling otherwise impenetrable.

William Wordsworth

And homeless near a thousand homes I stood, And near a thousand tables pined and wanted food.

William Wordsworth

From the body of one guilty deed a thousand ghostly fears and haunting thoughts proceed.

William Wordsworth

What we have loved, others will love, and we will teach them how; instruct them how the mind of man becomes a thousand times more beautiful than the earth on which he dwells...

William Wordsworth

I listen'd, motionless and still; And, as I mounted up the hill, The music in my heart I bore, Long after it was heard no more.

William Wordsworth

In ourselves our safety must be sought. By our own right hand it must be wrought.

William Wordsworth

The good die first.

William Wordsworth

Therefore, let the moon shine on thee in thy solitary walk; And let the misty-mountain winds be free to blow against thee.

William Wordsworth

Every great and original writer, in proportion as he is great and original, must himself create the taste by which he is to be relished.

William Wordsworth

All that we behold is full of blessings.

William Wordsworth

She died, and left to me This heath, this calm and quiet scene, The memory of what has been, And never more will be.

William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!

William Wordsworth

How does the meadow-flower its bloom unfold? Because the lovely little flower is free Down to its root, and in that freedom bold.

William Wordsworth

Duty were our games.

William Wordsworth

Books! tis a dull and endless strife: Come, hear the woodland linnet, How sweet his music! on my life, There's more of wisdom in it.

William Wordsworth

Hence, in a season of calm weather Though inland far we be, Our souls have sight of that immortal sea

William Wordsworth

Dreams, books, are each a world; and books, we know, Are a substantial world, both pure and good.

William Wordsworth

But trailing clouds of glory do we come from God, who is our home.

William Wordsworth

I'll teach my boy the sweetest things; I'll teach him how the owlet sings.

William Wordsworth

Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers ~ but like lemmings running headlong to the sea, we are oblivious.

William Wordsworth

In sleep I heard the northern gleams; The stars they were among my dreams; In sleep did I behold the skies

William Wordsworth

Come forth, and bring with you a heart That watches and receives.

William Wordsworth

A deep distress hath humanised my soul.

William Wordsworth

Feeling comes in aid Of feeling, and diversity of strength Attends us, if but once we have been strong.

William Wordsworth

Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge; it is the impassioned expression which is the countenance of all science.

William Wordsworth

Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul: While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and the deep power of joy, We see into the life of things.

William Wordsworth

But the sweet face of Lucy Gray Will never more be seen. The storm came on before its time: She wandered up and down; And many a hill did Lucy climb: But never reached the town.

William Wordsworth

I travelled among unknown men in lands beyond the sea . . .

William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us.

William Wordsworth

...and in thy voice I catch the language of my former heart, and read my former pleasures in the shooting lights of thy wild eyes.

William Wordsworth

He spake of love, such love as spirits feel In worlds whose course is equable and pure: No fears to beat away - no strife to heal, The past unsighed for, and the future sure.

William Wordsworth

Suffering is permanent, obscure and dark, And has the nature of infinity.

William Wordsworth

Getting and spending we lay waste our powers.

William Wordsworth

A cheerful life is what the Muses love, A soaring spirit is their prime delight.

William Wordsworth

Society has parted man from man, neglectful of the universal heart.

William Wordsworth

Though nothing will bring back the hour of splendor in the grass, of glory in the flower; we will grieve not, rather find strength in what remains behind.

William Wordsworth

He is by nature led To peace so perfect that the young behold With envy, what the old man hardly feels.

William Wordsworth

Is then no nook of English ground secure From rash assault?

William Wordsworth

Our meddlesome intellect misshapen the beauteous form of things.

William Wordsworth

Go to the poets, they will speak to thee More perfectly of purer creatures--

William Wordsworth

And I was taught to feel, perhaps too much, The self-sufficing power of solitude.

William Wordsworth

Poetry is the image of man and nature

William Wordsworth

Though inland far we be, Our souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither.

William Wordsworth

If this belief from heaven be sent, If such be Nature's holy plan, Have I not reason to lament What man has made of man?

William Wordsworth

We not only wish to be pleased, but to be pleased in that particular way in which we have been accustomed to be pleased.

William Wordsworth

One Lesson, Shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shews, and what conceals, Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.

William Wordsworth

The child is father of the man

William Wordsworth

O joy! that in our embers Is something that doth live.

William Wordsworth

I've heard of hearts unkind, kind deeds With coldness still returning; Alas! the gratitude of men Has oftener left me mourning.

William Wordsworth

Where are your books? - that light bequeathed To beings else forlorn and blind! Up! up! and drink the spirit breathed From dead men to their kind.

William Wordsworth

[...]the stately and slow-moving Turk, With freight of slippers piled beneath his arm.

William Wordsworth

The child is the father of the man.

William Wordsworth

Whither is fled the visionary gleam? Where is it now, the glory and the dream?

William Wordsworth