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A collection of Titus Maccius Plautus quotes and sayings on politics, life, God, government, wisdom, practice, friend, heaven, law, courage etc.

12 Quotes By Plautus That Give Insight Into Life

Quick Facts

Famous As: Comedy writer

Born On: 254 BC

Died On: 184 BC

Born In: Sarsina

Died At Age: 70

Titus Maccius Plautus, commonly known as Platus, was a Roman playwright famous for penning down Palliata comoedia. There is historic evidence of the fact that Plautus was the creator of comedy genre in Latin literature. Although legends say that Livius Andronicus was the original innovator of this genre. His comedies were loosely based on adaptations from Greek models for a Roman audience. Plautus revamped ancient Greek playwrights and texts by adding flavors suitable for the generic Roman audience. Only 20 out of the 130 plays written by Platautus have survived. Plautus’ works can be distinguished into surviving and fragmentary plays. Some of the popular works include Mostellaria, Poenulus, Agroicus ("The Rustic Man") and Carbonaria ("The Female Charcoal-Burner"). Even though critics claimed Plautus’ work as “crude”, it illuminated inspiration for various giants of literature during The Middle Ages, early Renaissance, and Shakespearian era. We have collected Plautus’ quotes from his works on life, death, grief, evil, perseverance and eloquence. Let us go these quotes from this Roman playwright.

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Let us celebrate the occasion with wine and sweet words.

Plautus

Nothing but heaven itself is better than a friend who is really a friend.

Plautus

Let deeds match words.

Plautus

He means well' is useless unless he does well.

Plautus

For nobody is curious, who isn't malevolent.

Plautus

He whom the Gods love dies young.

Plautus

No man is wise enough by himself.

Plautus

After all, what is money apart from what it can buy?

Plautus

Patience is the best remedy for every trouble.

Plautus

Ut saepe summa ingenia in occulto latent (How often the greatest talents are shrouded in obscurity)

Plautus

Est etiam, ubi profecto damnum prstet facere, quam lucrum - there are occasions when it is certainly better to lose than to gain

Plautus