Authors: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A collection of quotes by Horace on death, life, shadow, satire, wisdom, life, soul, nature, travel, love, peace, war, patriotic and poetry.

92 Great Quotes By Horace, The Celebrated Roman Poet And Satirist

Famous As: Roman poet
Born On: December 8, 65
Died On: November 27, 8
Born In: Venosa, Italy
Died At Age: 57
Quintus Horatius Flaccus, who is popularly referred to as Horace by English speaking people was a Roman poet, soldier and government servant in ancient Rome, who lived between 65 BC and 8 BC. He rose to prominence during the rule of Augustus. Horace is famous for writing satires, epistles and iambic poetry in Latin that made him an extremely well-known poet during his lifetime. However, poetry was not his life’s ambition. He had been in the republican army that had been defeated and was granted asylum by Augustus. He managed to get a job as a public notary in Rome that gave him ample time to work on his poems. Horace became a renowned poet in ancient Rome due to his refreshingly sardonic and sarcastic style. Persius, who had also been a Satirist in ancient Rome, praised Horace’s style in effusive terms. Some of his most distinguished works include ‘Odes’, ‘The Art Of Poetry’ and Satires. Horace was indeed a man of dry wit and a great sense of humor. Many of his words have become quite famous as his quotes and thoughts and are quoted extensively. His thoughts and quotations tackle the most serious and sensitive topics in a lighter tone. Here are few of Horace’s notable quotes and sayings.
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Pulvis et umbra sumus. (We are but dust and shadow.)

Horace

Begin, be bold, and venture to be wise.

Horace

Caelum non animum mutant qui trans mare currunt. (They change their sky, not their soul, who rush across the sea.)

Horace

Rule your mind or it will rule you.

Horace

Pactum serva" - "Keep the faith

Horace

He who is greedy is always in want

Horace

In love there are two evils: war and peace.

Horace

Anger is a brief madness.

Horace

Wisdom is not wisdom when it is derived from books alone

Horace

A picture is a poem without words.

Horace

Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents which, in prosperous circumstances, would have lain dormant.

Horace

Once a word has been allowed to escape, it cannot be recalled.

Horace

Dimidium facti qui coepit habet: sapere aude" ("He who has begun is half done: dare to know!").

Horace

He will always be a slave who does not know how to live upon a little.

Horace

Without love and laughter there is no joy; live amid love and laughter.

Horace

He who postpones the hour of living rightly is like the rustic who waits for the river to run out before he crosses.

Horace

Whatever advice you give, be brief.

Horace

He who feared that he would not succeed sat still.

Horace

Capture your reader, let him not depart, from dull beginnings that refuse to start

Horace

Now is the time to drink!

Horace

Virtue, dear friend, needs no defense, The surest guard is innocence: None knew, till guilt created fear, What darts or poisoned arrows were

Horace

Cease to ask what the morrow will bring forth, and set down as gain each day that fortune grants.

Horace

Even as we speak, time speeds swiftly away.

Horace

Mingle a little folly with your wisdom; a little nonsense now and then is pleasant.

Horace

You may drive out Nature with a pitchfork, yet she still will hurry back.

Horace

What we read with pleasure we read again with pleasure.

Horace

Pale Death with impartial tread beats at the poor man's cottage door and at the palaces of kings.

Horace

Leave off asking what tomorrow will bring, and whatever days fortune will give, count them as profit.

Horace

Faults are soon copied.

Horace

In peace, as a wise man, he should make suitable preparation for war.

Horace

Subdue your passion or it will subdue you.

Horace

Let him live under the open sky, and dangerously.

Horace

How slight and insignificant is the thing which casts down or restores a mind greedy for praise.

Horace

What you have not published, you can destroy. The word once sent forth can never be recalled.

Horace

Fortune makes a fool of those she favors too much.

Horace

Then come at once and pause for breath In chasing wealth. Remembering death And death's dark fires, mix, while you may, Method and madness, work and play. Folly is sweet, well-timed.

Horace

The man who is tenacious of purpose in a rightful cause is not shaken from his firm resolve by the frenzy of his fellow citizens clamoring for what is wrong, or by the tyrant's threatening countenance.

Horace

I shall not wholly die and a great part of me will escape the grave

Horace

Clogged with yesterday's excess, the body drags the mind down with it.

Horace

You must often make erasures if you mean to write what is worthy of being read a second time; and don't labor for the admiration of the crowd, but be content with a few choice readers

Horace

Remember when life's path is steep to keep your mind even. Horace

Horace

Struggling to be brief I become obscure.

Horace

Humour is often stronger and more effective than sharpness in cutting knotty issues.

Horace

Make money, money by fair means if you can, if not, but any means money.

Horace

I had rather seem mad and a sluggard, so that my defects are agreeable to myself, or that I am not pinfully conscious of them, than be wise, and chaptious.

Horace

Treacherous ashes hide The fires through which you stride

Horace

This is a fault common to singers that among their friends they were never inclined to sing when they were asked, unasked they never desist.

Horace

If you wish me to weep, you yourself Must first feel grief.

Horace

Ira furor brevis est: animum rege: qui nisi paret imperat. (Anger is a brief madness: govern your mind [temper], for unless it obeys it commands.)

Horace

He who has begun has half done. Dare to be wise; begin!

Horace

He will through life be master of himself and a happy man who from day to day can have said, "I have lived: tomorrow the Father may fill the sky with black clouds or with cloudless sunshine.

Horace

Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero. (Pluck the day [for it is ripe], trusting as little as possible in tomorrow.)

Horace

He gets every vote who combines the useful with the pleasant, and who, at the same time he pleases the reader, also instructs him.

Horace

Either stick to tradition or see that your inventions be consistent.

Horace

There are words and accents by which this grief can be assuaged, and the disease in a great measure removed.

Horace

Of writing well, be sure, the secret lies In wisdom :therefore study to be wise.

Horace

A shoe that is too large is apt to trip one, and when too small, to pinch the feet. So it is with those whose fortune does not suit them.

Horace

Think to yourself that every day is your last; the hour to which you do not look forward will come as a welcome surprise.

Horace

Life grants nothing to us mortals without hard work.

Horace

Mingle a dash of folly with your wisdom.

Horace

It is not enough for poems to be beautiful; they must be affecting, and must lead the heart of the hearer as they will.

Horace

As we speak, cruel time is fleeing. Seize the day, believing as little as possible in the morrow.

Horace

Surely a Man may speak Truth with a smiling countenance.

Horace

A cultivated wit, one that badgers less, can persuade all the more. Artful ridicule can address contentious issues more competently and vigorously than can severity alone.

Horace

The lofty pine is oftenest shaken by the winds; High towers fall with a heavier crash; And the lightning strikes the highest mountain.

Horace

If you can realistically render a cypress tree, would you include one when commissioned to paint a sailor in the midst of a shipwreck?

Horace

He has half the deed done who has made a beginning.

Horace

Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. (Mountains are in labour, a ridiculous mouse will be born)

Horace

You may thresh a hundred thousand bushels of grain, / But more than mine your belly will not contain.

Horace

Finxerunt animi, raro et perpauca loquentis. (To action little, less to words inclinded.)

Horace

Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret et mala perrumpet furtim fastidia victrix. (Drive Nature out with a pitchfork, she'll come right back, Victorious over your ignorant confident scorn.)

Horace

It is courage, courage, courage, that raises the blood of life to crimson splendor. Live bravely and present a brave front to adversity.

Horace

Captive Greece took captive her savage conquerer and brought the arts to rustic Latium

Horace

Saepa stilum vertas, iterum quae digna legi sint scripturas. (Turn the stylus [to erase] often if you would write something worthy of being reread.)

Horace

Natales grate numeras? (Do you count your birthdays with gratitude?)

Horace